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20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 2
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
states and the nontarget states if you look at the eight target states, colorado, florida, iowa, nevada, new hampshire, north carolina, ohio, virginia, obama's percentage only declined 1.5% from 2008. the rest of the country whether you're talking about the republican or democratic states or the kind of fleet target states in minnesota, pennsylvania, wisconsin, obama's percentage was down 2.8% about double the amount. he would carry the rest of the country aside from the target states but not as big of a percentage. one of the fascinating things at this election is the electorate that believes things are moving in the wrong direction and has been giving the contras dismal job ratings really electing a democratic president retained an even more republican and democratic sen met with some powerful assists from some republican candidates come and i wonder if they investigated the possibility of moles. anyway, the -- they've retained a republican house. an article in "the wall street journal" coming out tomorrow on this issue. the house issue. republicans according to the current town had a
. hispanics are a small slice, but a growing slice in virginia. this is not colorado or nevada or mexico. nonetheless, hispanics in virginia, as in many of the other states, to be very heavily democratic. and so, to the extent they turn out, even if they are only 4% of the statewide votes in any given year, they can assist democrats. let me mention asian americans, because they have become increasingly important in virginia, even though they are a small percentage of the population and the registered population. in northern virginia in particular, they have become exceptionally active. they give a lot of money to candidates. they are predominantly democratic, although slices of the asian-american population, such as vietnamese americans, will support republicans. it goes to show that in a diverse population, virginia has become tremendously diverse. when i was growing up, the white turnout on election day was about 85% of the total. 70'smentioned, it's low today. that makes a giant difference. you can tell it in the election results. even a small slice of the population can have a big im
moved to nevada off of be in play list of the leading democratic list as it became clear to the polls and eventually from the early voting statistics that president obama was giving of a pretty strong lead in that state. >> so as the map comes together, what date does the "los angeles times" used to determine? >> we use a mixture of things early in the process. you are mostly relaunching on the public polls as the process goes a long to other things factor into it and one is the reporting that our political staff does. we've had reporters in all of the battleground states as it goes along. we get a lot of information from our reporters and as one's early voting get started, we've been and it's particularly important in nevada i was also important in north carolina we had moved north carolina off of our battleground list because it seemed like the public opinion polls were suggesting that the republicans had a fairly strong lead that it wants the early vote came in, they were very similar to 2008 in which president obama very narrowly won the state. so, we move to north carolina backin
what a difference our efforts made in key states like ohio and wisconsin and nevada. >> i think without the efforts of organized labor, those three states would have been different. >> alisyn: that was the president of the afl-cio taking partial credit for the president's reelection win. exit polls show that he's right. let's take a look at the support from union households in three key swing states. the president won by 22 points in ohio. 32 points in wisconsin. and there was a 17-point spread in nevada. so what does president obama now owe the unions for supporting him? joining us is the author of "shadow boxing, government unions control america and rob taxpayers blind," mallory factor. nice to see you again. >> good to see you. >> alisyn: so that was richard trumka taking a victory lap, basically saying they turned out lots of support for the president. the president wouldn't have won without him. is he overstating the case? >> no. he's understating the case. it is unbelievable the amount of resources that the unions put out. they gave him a half a billion dollars and they had 400,0
of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we planned for, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same percent of the electorate as in 2008. we got 65% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, voting rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battleground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 1996. in florida increase from 14% in 2008 to 17% in 2012. we increased our vote share in florida from 57 to 60, which appears to be a high mark for any democratic candidate. for the first time since the r
, virginia, colorado, nevada, those are states that used to be reliably conservative and seem to have gone into the, well, they all went into the obama category this time. we don't know about florida yet. you change those around, you have got a different president. what happened? >> well i think in large part it was the presence of the latino vote as a significant bloc, jon. i think this is part of the changing face of america in general and population. but in the specific context of last night's election it is the changing face of the american electorate. you take a state like florida, you know, used to be, you would think, it is cuban-americans. now as we heard, puerto ricans, people coming from all over latin america. they are not reliably republican voters. in fact, last night, cuban-americans went for romney but the rest of that latino population, way outnumbered them and went heavily for president obama. and you know this is reflected then in questions like, you know, which candidate cares about people like me? which candidate is going to reflect my interests, and for hispanics who w
. secondly, i had lengthy discussions with the democratic leader of nevada, harry reid, as well as my good friend, george mitchell of maine, on this very question. i came away from these conversations reassured that my independence would be respected and that no party line commitment would be required or expected. and so i've decided to affiliate myself with the democratic caucus, because doing so will allow me to take independent positions on issues as they arise and at the same time will allow me to be an effective representative of the people of maine. one final word. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. i'd like to repeat that. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. in the situation of a republican house, a democratic senate but with substantial powers residing in the minority and a democratic president, no one party can control the outcome of our collective deliberations. as bill clinton might say, it's just arithmetic. in fact, this situation of a divided government has only two possible outco
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)